Lapis Lazuli in Medieval Nun’s Teeth Reveals Forgotten History of Female Religious Artists – 中世纪修女牙齿中的青金石揭示了被遗忘的女性宗教艺术家的历史。

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10 Jan 2019

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Lapis Lazuli in Medieval Nun’s Teeth Reveals Forgotten History of Female Religious Artists

10 Jan 2019

Flecks of rare blue pigment found in a skeleton show women were also skilled manuscript painters 900 years ago

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Lapis Lazuli in Medieval Nun’s Teeth Reveals Forgotten History of Female Religious Artists - 中世纪修女牙齿中的青金石揭示了被遗忘的女性宗教艺术家的历史。

Pigment deposits in a nun’s teeth. Courtesy: Chrisitna Warinner, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Germany

A discovery by a multidisciplinary team from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History has challenged the commonly held view that Medieval manuscript illuminators were men. Particles of rare blue pigment were found in the teeth of a Medieval nun, suggesting that women were more involved in the production of prestigious religious texts than previously thought.

Several years ago, Anita Radini, an archaeologist at the University of York, discovered fragments of blue stone in the dental plaque of a nun from Medieval Germany, dated to between 997 and 1162 AD. Radini shared her findings with Christina Warinner, group leader of archaeogenetics at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Germany. They set up a multidisciplinary team of scholars to investigate the origin of the mysterious blue particles. ‘They looked like little robins’s eggs, they were so bright,’ Warinner told the New York Times.

The research, published in the journal Science Advances, revealed the fragments to be flecks of an ultramarine pigment, made of lapis lazuli stone – one of the most expensive colourings available to Medieval artists. The research team concluded that the nun was likely a painter and scribe of religious texts, occupying a skilled position to be responsible for such a rare material. The pigment is thought to have been found on the nun’s teeth as she used her mouth to shape her paintbrush.

The discovery challenges art historical assumptions that medieval European women were not involved in the production of religious texts. ‘Picture someone copying a medieval book — if you picture anything, you’re going to picture a monk, not a nun,’ said study co-author Alison Beach, a historian at Ohio State University.

‘We struggle to find sources reflecting women’s lives in the Middle Ages that aren’t filtered through men’s experiences or opinions about what women’s lives should have been,’ Beach continued. ‘Now, we have a direct piece of evidence about what this woman did on a day-to-day basis – all because they didn’t brush their teeth.’

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新闻/2019年1月10日新闻/2019年1月10日中世纪修女牙齿中的天青石揭示了被遗忘的女性宗教艺术家的历史2019年1月10日在一个骨骼展显示,女性也是900年前熟练的手稿画家,abjaw16x9_0.jpg Lapis Lazuli in Medieval Nun’s Teeth Reveals Forgotten History of Female Religious Artists - 中世纪修女牙齿中的青金石揭示了被遗忘的女性宗教艺术家的历史。颜料沉积在修女的牙齿里。礼貌:德国马克斯普朗克人类历史科学研究所的Chrisitna Warinner,马克斯普朗克人类历史科学研究所的一个多学科团队的发现,挑战了普遍认为中世纪手稿照明者是人的观点。在一位中世纪修女的牙齿中发现了罕见的蓝色颜料颗粒,这表明女性比以前想象的更多地参与了著名宗教文献的制作。几年前,约克大学的考古学家安妮塔·拉迪尼(Anita Radini)在一位中世纪德国修女的牙菌斑中发现了青石碎片,时间为公元997年至1162年间。拉迪尼将她的发现与通用电气的马克斯普朗克人类历史科学研究所的考古学小组负责人克里斯蒂娜·沃林特(Christina Warinner)分享。很多。他们成立了一个多学科的学者小组来研究神秘蓝色粒子的起源。“它们看起来像小知更鸟的蛋,非常明亮,”沃恩告诉《纽约时报》。

这项研究发表在《科学进展》杂志上,揭示了这些碎片是由青金石制成的一种群青颜料的斑点,青金石是中世纪艺术家最昂贵的颜料之一。研究小组得出的结论是,修女很可能是一位画家和宗教文本的抄写员,对如此稀有的材料负有责任,他拥有一个熟练的职位。据说修女用嘴塑造画笔时,牙齿上发现了这种色素。

这一发现对艺术历史假设提出了挑战,即中世纪欧洲妇女没有参与宗教文本的制作。俄亥俄州立大学历史学家艾莉森•比奇(Alison Beach)说,想象一下有人抄袭了一本中世纪的书——如果你画了什么,你会看到一个和尚,而不是修女。比奇继续说:“我们努力寻找反映中世纪妇女生活的信息来源,而这些信息并不是通过男性对女性生活本应是什么的经历或看法来过滤的。”“现在,我们有了一个直接的证据,证明这个女人每天都在做什么–所有这些都是因为他们没有刷牙。”新闻/艺术历史新闻宗教中世纪艺术


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